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Intersectional Perspective on Climate Change: Conference on Making Accessible Information to Combat the Climate Crisis

14.01.2022
The Podcast for the Environment project will hold the Intersectional View on Climate Change: Generating Accessible Information to Combat the Climate Crisis Conference on February 26.

Those who want to attend the conference will be able to apply to the conference, especially on the topics of sustainability, food security and food sovereignty, veganism, non-human-based environmental studies, environment and civil society, environment and gender, environment and migration, and natural sciences.

Those who want to apply to the conference can send their 250-word summary and short CVs to [email protected] until January 24, 2022.

İYAÇEP

The conference call is as follows;

The importance of intersectional thinking in understanding the effects of climate change has been emphasized by many researchers (Perkins, 2018; Hathaway, 2019; Di Chiro, 2020; Ergasi, McKinney, and Bell, 2021). The concept of intersectionality, developed by Kimberle Crenshaw in the 1990s (Crenshaw, 1991), in its simplest form, reveals that categories such as class, race, ethnicity, nation, class, age, sexual orientation, and gender identity can work together, leading to different discrimination and stigmatization. puts it. In other words; intersectionality enables us to analyze the discriminations and stigmatizations that can be experienced within and between categories, rather than taking these categories as monolithic and self-consistent structures.

The intersectional approach is very important to understand why climate change has turned into a “crisis” and to determine who will experience the effects of climate change more severely in the short and long term. This approach has the power to answer important questions such as: Which groups' food security and sovereignty will be primarily compromised by climate change? How does just having a human-centered view of the climate crisis affect all living and non-living beings with whom we share the world and make the climate crisis worse? How do women's existing structural inequalities affect their capacity to combat climate change? Or, how is “believing in the climate crisis” or “taking action on the climate crisis” gendered? And through this gendering, how does the cis-hetero patriarchal system deny the climate crisis?

For us to find answers to these questions and many more, we are holding a conference on 26.02.2022 as part of the "Podcast for the Environment" project. To date, we have tried to produce accessible information by looking at climate change from an intersectional axis in our podcast episodes (you can access the episodes  from the link below). We took care to explain the topics we discussed in a way that audiences from all walks of life could understand. This conference aims to make accessible research that looks at climate change from an intersectional axis. The presentations made at the conference, which will be open to the participation of everyone, will later be broadcast as episodes in the "Podcast for the Environment" series.

You can apply to our conference with your studies on climate change, primarily in the following areas:

Climate crisis in terms of sustainability, food security and food sovereignty, veganism, non-human-based environmental studies, environment and civil society, environment and gender, environment and migration, and natural sciences.

You can send a 250-word summary of the presentation you plan to apply for and your short CV to [email protected] until 24.01.2022. You will be informed about your application result on 30.01.2022.

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